At Last, Spring

After a long Vermont winter, and several weeks watching winter and spring battling each other for dominance, I feel I can finally announce: spring has arrived. In Idaho, I was used to April being the month when wildflowers emerged. Entire hillsides would be awash in the bright, happy yellow of sunflowers. Now, I've learned, in… Continue reading At Last, Spring

A Cairn for the Coyote

Conall is still wary when we venture near where we heard the coyote crying in pain last weekend. This morning, that wariness is compounded when we hear two rifle shots in rapid succession just as we leave the house on our way to the fields and woods. The sound comes from the same area as… Continue reading A Cairn for the Coyote

Get Back On the Horse

Saturday, March 5, 2022 I’m struggling. Something happened today that was terribly disturbing. I need to work through it, write about it, see if there's a way to turn a terrible negative into something a little bit positive. It’s evening, I’m listening to the soothing music of Eamonn Karran streaming over the Internet as I… Continue reading Get Back On the Horse

A Whiff of Spring

I'm learning how seasons transition in my new home in Vermont. The past couple of weeks, every time my dogs and I ventured outside, I heard new bird song. Nothing says spring more vociferously than the happy songs of migrating birds! Over the deepest part of winter, I was lucky if I heard a crow's… Continue reading A Whiff of Spring

Do Nothing but Listen

Finn barks when asking to come inside. Conall carefully clicks a toenail on the glass. That fundamental characteristic of Alaskan Malamutes – their quietness – is why I love them. They are sensitive to noise. They're keen listeners, hearing and interpreting the most subtle sounds. I’ve learned to listen through them, paying attention when they… Continue reading Do Nothing but Listen

Respect

My long-time friend Miki visited for a few days this past week. In the days before the start of her visit, I had a writing breakthrough, an insight about how to enter the world of my new book – what I refer to as the “wolf book” – or, more precisely, the (likely) opening scene… Continue reading Respect

Peacham Bog

Conall and I recently explored a bit of nearby Groton State Forest. At more than 26,000 acres, this forest is the second largest contiguous land holding of the State of Vermont. Conall strikes a pose as we head up the trail. The terrain is rolling, forested, and contains several bodies of water: Lake Groton (422… Continue reading Peacham Bog

It’s Time to Write About Wolves

For months now, my life has been in a state of upheaval. Leaving Idaho. Moving to Vermont. Settling in and adjusting. It has been a bumpy, scary, exciting and ultimately life-altering-in-a-good-way twelve months. This morning, walking through rain-soaked field grass with Finn and Conall, a light mist thickening the air and hushing the world around… Continue reading It’s Time to Write About Wolves

Poetic Fliers: Monarch Butterflies

One recent morning, as the boys and I were finishing our two-mile perambulation through the fields and woods across the road, I noticed a Monarch butterfly leave the maple trees alongside our path and begin its effortless dance through the air, in search of nectar. Then another Monarch departed from the maples just ahead of… Continue reading Poetic Fliers: Monarch Butterflies

Woolly Bears: A Sign of Autumn

No, Woolly Bears aren't large, furry mammals like black, brown, panda, or polar bears. The Woolly Bears I'm referring to are insects. They're the adorably fuzzy black-with-rust-band caterpillars that appear throughout the U.S. and parts of Canada and Mexico every autumn, usually in September. I remember being delighted spotting them as a child growing up… Continue reading Woolly Bears: A Sign of Autumn