May Day

This post's title and content refers to the old European meaning of May Day. A festival of ancient origins marking the beginning of summer, usually celebrated on 1 May, around halfway between the spring equinox and summer solstice. Traditions often include gathering wildflowers and green branches, weaving floral garlands, crowning a May Queen (sometimes with… Continue reading May Day

Shadows

There are two types of shadows. There are the figurative shadows that are meant to control people by casting fear, disharmony, and darkness: war; disinformation; control; violence. Then there are the literal shadows of nature that mix with sunlight to tickle the eye and elevate one's mood. Nature's shadows remind us that defiance can take… Continue reading Shadows

Wind

It seems I have landed in a particularly windy place here in Vermont. November and December have, so far, brought some magnificent wind storms. Gusts in the 30-40 mph range. Regularly. Will this continue through the rest of the winter months? Time will tell. I’m new here. One such wind storm came through last night.… Continue reading Wind

Kansas to Vermont

It’s a rainy, dark and cold Saturday evening in Vermont. I’ve built a fire in the wood stove and poured myself a glass of wine. I’m in a nostalgic mood. I’ve been thinking about how, in two ways, I manage to bring a little bit of Kansas with me wherever I go: a desk, and… Continue reading Kansas to Vermont

So. Many. Leaves!

My entire adult life, I've read about and seen photos of the fall colors in New England, Vermont in particular. "Some day," I would sigh. That day has arrived. And I'm here to tell you, Vermont lives up to its autumn leaves reputation. Growing up in western Washington, just outside Seattle, I was familiar with… Continue reading So. Many. Leaves!

Peacham Bog

Conall and I recently explored a bit of nearby Groton State Forest. At more than 26,000 acres, this forest is the second largest contiguous land holding of the State of Vermont. Conall strikes a pose as we head up the trail. The terrain is rolling, forested, and contains several bodies of water: Lake Groton (422… Continue reading Peacham Bog

Seeing Red

No, I'm not angry. Rather, I'm gobsmacked by the beautiful array of reds nature puts on display in Vermont this time of year. And to think the autumn colors show is just getting started! Let me show you what I mean. I started noticing red started in the leaves carpeting a rail trail where Conall… Continue reading Seeing Red

It’s Time to Write About Wolves

For months now, my life has been in a state of upheaval. Leaving Idaho. Moving to Vermont. Settling in and adjusting. It has been a bumpy, scary, exciting and ultimately life-altering-in-a-good-way twelve months. This morning, walking through rain-soaked field grass with Finn and Conall, a light mist thickening the air and hushing the world around… Continue reading It’s Time to Write About Wolves

Woolly Bears: A Sign of Autumn

No, Woolly Bears aren't large, furry mammals like black, brown, panda, or polar bears. The Woolly Bears I'm referring to are insects. They're the adorably fuzzy black-with-rust-band caterpillars that appear throughout the U.S. and parts of Canada and Mexico every autumn, usually in September. I remember being delighted spotting them as a child growing up… Continue reading Woolly Bears: A Sign of Autumn

Queen Anne’s Lace

Anyone reading my blog knows I enjoy seeing, photographing, and learning about wildflowers. Moving to Vermont in July, I was eager to see and learn about the “new” wildflowers I would find here. Almost immediately my eye was caught by Queen Anne’s Lace. Big, showy, white flowers – actually clusters of tiny individual flowers –… Continue reading Queen Anne’s Lace