The Bumblers Have Returned

I'm referring to the large, fuzzy, pollen-collecting bumblebees, of course. Not some synonymous "blunderer, botcher, bungler, butcher, fumbler, sad sack, stumbler." These bumblebees love the columbine and lupine growing in my wildflower garden beside the house. Last year they appeared much earlier in June, so I was concerned, wondering if I'd see them again, but… Continue reading The Bumblers Have Returned

Prescribed Burns

My last post described the twin events of spring in the forests of Idaho's central mountains: blooming wildflowers and prescribed burns. By pure happenstance, the Forest Service decided to do prescribed burns in my two favored locations for springtime runs and hikes with my dogs: in the forest just a mile above my house, and… Continue reading Prescribed Burns

Spring in the Forest: Blooms and Burns

The morning of May 12th I awoke to the smell of smoke in the air, that pleasant sitting-around-a-campfire smell. At daybreak, I could also see it, hovering over the ground like a thin, dirty-white veil, wrapping my house and everything on the valley slope as it slowly rose to meet the forest. The feature photo… Continue reading Spring in the Forest: Blooms and Burns

Point of View

I continue pursuing emerging wildflowers as spring progresses in Idaho's mountains. I'm obsessed. I dream of a quiet man who explains nothing and defends nothing, but only knows where the rarest wildflowers are blooming, and who goes, and finds that he is smiling not by his own will.Wendell Berry A friend, Karen S, recently recommended… Continue reading Point of View

Happy Spring Equinox!

It hardly looks like spring here in Idaho's mountains. The ground is still covered in well over a foot of snow. Many in more temperate climates are already greeting crocuses and daffodils, and cherry trees are blossoming. She turned to the sunlightAnd shook her yellow head,And whispered to her neighbor:“Winter is dead.”A. A. Milne Not… Continue reading Happy Spring Equinox!

A Fool in Love (with Nature)

More foolishness fills our days following the previous post about spring, or more precisely, the "fool's spring" that tempts people living in the mountains into believing that winter is over. Fool's spring is a tease. But a delightful tease. If the past few days are representative of "fool's spring" in the mountains of Idaho, then… Continue reading A Fool in Love (with Nature)

Fool’s Spring

Living in the mountains, one quickly learns that predicting weather in March is a fool's errand. For several weeks, the swings between winter and spring are wild and seemingly random. Nature teases with warm days of sunshine, melting the long winter's snow pack on the ground and inviting you to step outside without jacket, hat… Continue reading Fool’s Spring

Icicles

Snow and icicles are winter's bonded pair. Icicles are beautiful. Ephemeral. Tough yet brittle. Marvels of nature's mixture of warm and cold, temporary sculptures tickling our senses while reminding us that nothing lasts forever. Winter giveth the fields, and the trees so old, their beards of icicles and snow.Henry Wadsworth Longfellow It's not only the… Continue reading Icicles

Raven Check-in

It has been a long while since Conall caught a vole in the yard, so his food bank for the local raven pair has been bare. I worried that the ravens had given up on us as I hadn't seen or heard them much recently. Now I realize that was mostly due to weather. We've… Continue reading Raven Check-in

Snow and Voles: the Drama Continues

The snow just keeps falling. And accumulating. I measured 40 inches (101.6 cm) on the ground this morning, February 17, 2021. Forecast calls for more snow over the next several days. Ullr - the Norse god of snow and patron saint of skiers - sure is delivering this winter. Skiers are happy. My last post… Continue reading Snow and Voles: the Drama Continues