Peacham Bog

Conall and I recently explored a bit of nearby Groton State Forest. At more than 26,000 acres, this forest is the second largest contiguous land holding of the State of Vermont. Conall strikes a pose as we head up the trail. The terrain is rolling, forested, and contains several bodies of water: Lake Groton (422… Continue reading Peacham Bog

Poetic Fliers: Monarch Butterflies

One recent morning, as the boys and I were finishing our two-mile perambulation through the fields and woods across the road, I noticed a Monarch butterfly leave the maple trees alongside our path and begin its effortless dance through the air, in search of nectar. Then another Monarch departed from the maples just ahead of… Continue reading Poetic Fliers: Monarch Butterflies

Woolly Bears: A Sign of Autumn

No, Woolly Bears aren't large, furry mammals like black, brown, panda, or polar bears. The Woolly Bears I'm referring to are insects. They're the adorably fuzzy black-with-rust-band caterpillars that appear throughout the U.S. and parts of Canada and Mexico every autumn, usually in September. I remember being delighted spotting them as a child growing up… Continue reading Woolly Bears: A Sign of Autumn

Queen Anne’s Lace

Anyone reading my blog knows I enjoy seeing, photographing, and learning about wildflowers. Moving to Vermont in July, I was eager to see and learn about the “new” wildflowers I would find here. Almost immediately my eye was caught by Queen Anne’s Lace. Big, showy, white flowers – actually clusters of tiny individual flowers –… Continue reading Queen Anne’s Lace

Reinvention, Part Three: Comparing and Contrasting

Maybe, like me, you endured school essay assignments where you had to compare and contrast something. Who knew that skill could end up being a useful blogging tool? Each day as I explore my new environment in Vermont, I can’t help but compare what I experience here to what I knew for the first 48… Continue reading Reinvention, Part Three: Comparing and Contrasting

The Bumblers Have Returned

I'm referring to the large, fuzzy, pollen-collecting bumblebees, of course. Not some synonymous "blunderer, botcher, bungler, butcher, fumbler, sad sack, stumbler." These bumblebees love the columbine and lupine growing in my wildflower garden beside the house. Last year they appeared much earlier in June, so I was concerned, wondering if I'd see them again, but… Continue reading The Bumblers Have Returned

Dog Photobombs IX – April – May 2021

It's that time of year again! Wildflower photo bloopers. While my dogs and I are out running or hiking in the forest, I enjoy taking photos of wildflowers and vistas. Conall and Finn patiently wait for me, usually following their noses nearby until I'm ready to start moving again. Most of my photos take mere… Continue reading Dog Photobombs IX – April – May 2021

Stress Buster: Wildflowers

Selling a house. While attempting to buy a house on the other side of the country before said sale is closed. Stressful! Coordinating the timing of both transactions so that I - and my dogs - don't end up homeless. Hugely stressful! It's crunch time, juggling closing on my sale while searching for something to… Continue reading Stress Buster: Wildflowers

Prescribed Burns

My last post described the twin events of spring in the forests of Idaho's central mountains: blooming wildflowers and prescribed burns. By pure happenstance, the Forest Service decided to do prescribed burns in my two favored locations for springtime runs and hikes with my dogs: in the forest just a mile above my house, and… Continue reading Prescribed Burns

Spring in the Forest: Blooms and Burns

The morning of May 12th I awoke to the smell of smoke in the air, that pleasant sitting-around-a-campfire smell. At daybreak, I could also see it, hovering over the ground like a thin, dirty-white veil, wrapping my house and everything on the valley slope as it slowly rose to meet the forest. The feature photo… Continue reading Spring in the Forest: Blooms and Burns